It’s crucial to understand what habits you’re teaching your students.

Teaching them complex moves won’t be as helpful if they need to defend themselves in the real world.

What if you could do both? The idea of that is appealing to me, but it’s not realistic.

For years, I thought that the self-defense and sparring knowledge from traditional karate could be useful. I was wrong.

It took me a long time to break some bad habits that came from traditional martial arts. One steps are not self-defense.

If you chose one skill set to focus on, the students would learn that skill faster.

The dojo is a place of learning. And because you’re the teacher, what you teach must be true right?

This makes it your responsibility to evaluate and revise your lesson plans every year.

Sport tae kwon do teaches you not to punch the head, but in the real world, most fights start with a punch to the head. 

Doesn’t this seem contradictory? Wouldn’t you want your student to be prepared against the common attack?

Point fighting is a type of fake fighting that is based on “killer blow” theories.

Students are trained to stop after striking or being struck, rather than continuing the attack until the opponent is defeated. 

Why would you train your students to stop after being hit or hitting?

That creates bad defense habits, as you’ll see in this video.

Another popular theory is that most fights end up on the ground.

Watch 20 street fights on YouTube and you’ll see about as many fights go to the ground as you do groin kicks. Not many.

That doesn’t mean you should not train in grappling.

I think grappling is essential and it is the big gap in my game.

Maybe because my instructor taught us in the first class that,  “Tae kwon do is a kicking art. The leg is a much longer and stronger weapon than the arm so we can kick an opponent before they get close enough to punch or tackle us.”

He really believed that. As a good student, so did I.

Continuous light contact kickboxing is the most practical stand-up sparring system in my experience.

This means you don’t stop to honor a point. Instead, you strike back.