Are You Guilty of this Common Teaching Mistake?

Are You Guilty of this Common Teaching Mistake?

Break the Habit of Tagging

This is a 2-minute video lesson from the Martial Arts Teacher’s Association Instructors’ Certification course. MATACertification.com

Have you ever spoken to someone or listen to a speaker that has a habit, a language pattern of finishing their sentences or statements or lessons off with the same phrase?

For instance, you’re talking to somebody and he’s explaining something and then asks, “You got me?” “You got me?” “You got me?”

Or,
“You know what I’m saying?”

“You hear me?”
“You hear me?”

That’s called a tag. A tag weakens your delivery because you’re asking for permission.

“OK” is another classic tag.

The instructor says “Fighting stance, OK? We’re going to do this, this, and this. OK?”

I’m not asking permission from the students to teach them fighting stance. They bowed into my class. Line up!

Joe Lewis had a tag. “Make sense?”

He would explain something…”Makes sense?”

He was a highly analytical technical teacher.

Contrast that with someone like Bruce Lee, who was far less about technique
and more about the spirit behind it.

The merging of both those teaching
styles, I think is ideal.

But because Joe was so analytical, he
wanted to make sure it made sense to you.

And in many cases, as a teacher it’s a trap that you fall into and you don’t really mean it.

What I mean by that is this. The worst tag right now that we’re hearing more than any other is, “Good job!”

“Everybody sit down. Good job.”

I watched an instructor just recently promoting his children’s program,
He was going to give a mat chat. He said, come on over here, kids.

He sat down and as a kid sat down, he turned to each kid and said,
“Excellent”

“Excellent”

“Excellent”

What the heck is excellent about sitting down?

It’s following instructions.

If that’s excellent, why would a child
walk any harder to earn your praise?

If it’s already awesome, what could be better?

How about making them work to earn those compliments?

We are living in the most narcissistic society possible, and as a martial art instructor, that is not something
you want to contribute to.

So pay attention to your tags.

“Got it?”

 

Dr. Judy Flury Named to MATA Certification Board

martial arts instructor certification

5th-degree black belt, Dr. Judy Flury opened her taekwondo school at age 17 while a junior in high school.

Once she graduated from high school, Dr. Flury ran her karate school while also attending college and then graduate school, ultimately earning a doctorate in personality psychology from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Dr. Flury is the author of “Raising a Real Winner: How to Teach Your Child the Qualities of Success” and has written or contributed to many book chapters and articles in various psychological publications.

All 23 board members have a black belt and are recognized experts in their pedagogical fields.

MATA Founder John Graden says, “I’ve been friends with Dr. Judy is one of my favorite people in the martial arts. She’s smart and brings a wealth of experience as a professional martial arts school owner and Ph.D.”

About her addition to the board, Dr. Flury says, “It is truly an honor to be on the MATA Certification Board, given its creator. From his WAKO world championship title to his creation of the first professional association, trade journal, and universal instructor certification program for martial artists, to his best-selling books on martial arts business and personal development, John Graden is a true pioneer. I’m delighted to be associated with this certification program that was created by “the Teacher of Teachers.” 

MATA’s Solution for Orphaned Black Belts

MATA’s Solution for Orphaned Black Belts

Joe Lewis Promotes John Graden to 7th

Joe Lewis Promotes John Graden to 7th Degree Black Belt


The Black Belt is the most well-known symbol of the martial arts. We all know that people perceive that the higher your Black Belt rank is the more accomplished you are.
However, many dedicated black belts like me were orphaned at some point in their career and left without an instructor to advance them in rank.

As I describe in my book, I was devastated when my instructor Walt Bone died in a plane crash in 1982. In 1983, Mike Anderson (Founder of the PKA, WAKO, Professional Karate magazine, and this thing called semi-contact karate) stepped in and promoted me.

Then Joe Lewis moved in with Mike in 1984. We became close friends and training partners. Over the course of the next 14 years, Joe Lewis promoted me through the ranks all the way to 8th in 2007.

Rank in martial arts is important. While there are no real standards, there is confidence in rank.

  1. Your students have more confidence in you because they see that you are still in the game.
  2. You have more confidence because you are advancing in the ranks of your profession.
  3. Regardless of the profession, advancement is always better than stagnation.

This is why I’ve created the MATA Rank Advancement Program. As the MATA Certification program has grown, graduates have been asking me if they could advance in rank under the MATA organization.

To be clear, MATA Certification is the first step to rank advancement. We’re not considering anyone who has not completed the MATA Certification course.

The requirements for the MATA Rank Advancement are not style oriented but are weighted on important technical skills and teaching ability.