8 Signs to Help You Reevaluate What You Teach and Call Self-Defense

I began teaching professionally in 1974 and for the next 30-years, like every other martial arts instructor, I advertised and believed I was teaching self-defense. That changed when, in 2006, I was watching my kids in a karate class at Chris Sutton’s school.

Though his assistants usually ran the class, one day Chris stepped in and taught a ten-minute anti-abduction segment. My jaw hit the floor. I turned to my wife and said, “I could not have taught 1-minute of that. That’s the best self-defense I’ve ever seen.” It still is. She was equally impressed. She enrolled in the COBRA-Defense Academy and is now an instructor with over 100 hours of training.

Chris modeled the COBRA-Defense system after his training in multiple police academies and training as a street cop, sheriff, and maximum security prison guard.

Your self-defense program needs to be based on a real field training designed to protect against violent criminals on a daily basis. There is a massive gap between self-defense and what is taught in martial arts schools.

Eight Signs That You Need to Reevaluate What You Teach and Call Self-Defense:

    1. If you rehearse fight scenes for demos.
    2. If you teach kids that they can defeat a grown man with the standard kick and punch format.
    3. If you do not have weapon disarms as part of your curriculum.
    4. If a technique requires the attacker to hold his punch in a paused manner in order to conduct the defense.
    5. If an escape requires multiple fine motor movements instead of gross motor movements.
    6. If you do not conduct scenario training such as ATM robberies or home invasions.
    7. If it does not include command presence and tactical communication.
    8. If you have never received training from a platform that is used in real life confrontation against violence and criminals as it’s defined purpose.

Find out about COBRA at SelfDefenseBusiness.com

Download the free COBRA app.

Is this Self-Defense?

Alan Smith and his fiancee stop at a Circle K. While she went in to get snacks, an SUV with four teens pull up next to Alan’s driver side, where is was sitting. They are playing music really loud. Alan asks them to turn it down.

One of the teens points a shotgun like object at him and threatens to kill him. Alan pulls out his pistol and shoots the teen with the shotgun. The teen dies on the scene.

The SUV reverses out of the parking space as Alan pulls off four more rounds that only hit the back door. As the SUV turned to race away, Alan kneels in the parking lot and fires three more shots. Two hit the bumper, and one flies through the SUV at head height.

Alan claims self-defense. There were no cameras outside but the shots were clearly recorded from the interior camera.

CopyEmail LuckyOrange