Management

Management

 

Daily & Weekly Reporting Procedures

Reporting keeps score on your performance. Your reports let you know how well you and your team are performing in every area. They also helps you to see any problem areas that may be developing well in advance. It will then be easy to take corrective action early when, through your tracking efforts, you find areas of your team’s performance that are not operating optimally.

Although it is vital to take the numbers down, in our business it’s better to analyze your numbers at the end of the week, unless you can see that something is way off course. For example, you see that you’ve had six phone calls today and no appointments. You’d better check the phone skills of your Team members immediately.

Note: It is vitally important that this information be documented accurately every day. Not documenting this data accurately every day will be cause for dismissal from the team. If you don’t care about your business, who will?

Basic Admission Statistics
Every day, you need to know the admission statistics, what’s happening with your school’s growth.

The first statistic you need is the number of Phone Calls Received. This lets you know how well your advertising and marketing efforts are performing and what changes, if any, need to be made.

The next statistic is Walk-ins. How many people are walking into your school? This let’s you know how attractive an appearance you have to the outside world.

Now we need to look at the number of guests your students are inviting to the school. This let’s you know how well you’re doing with your internal marketing and referral efforts.

After we have these three numbers you add them up to give you the number of inquiries for the day. If, for example, you had thee phone calls, I walk-in and two guests you would have six inquires (3 + I + 2). You would then add this number to the total inquires to date on yesterday’s statistics report. If the total to date as of yesterday was 10, you would add 10 + 6 to give you 16, which would go in the total number of inquires to date box.

The next statistic is the number of appointments made that day. At the end of the week the total number of your phone calls, walk-ins and guests statistics are totaled and checked against the total number of appointments. To find out how well your staff s sales skills are you simply divide the number of appointments by the number of inquiries. For example, if you have 12-inquires and you make 10-appointments, then you have 10/12= 83%. This means you have an 83% efficiency rate for making appointments.

80% is the goal we recommend everyone set for his or her operation.

The next number you’ll need is that of trial lessons performed. After the future student comes in for their appointment, how many take the trial lesson? Lets say out of the eight students who actually showed up, six took a trial lesson. This would give us 6 / 8 = 75%.

We recommend a goal of 80% for trial lessons made from actual appointments.

The final basic admissions number you’ll need is that of new students enrolled. You need to know how many new students do you enroll in comparison to trial lessons. If you had 12 trial lessons and you sign up 9 new students, this gives you 9 / 12 = 75%. This tells you for every 10 students you get in the door and take a trial lesson, 7.5 sign up. This is your closing percentage. It helps you determine if the person doing the trial lessons and enrolling the students are doing their job correctly. We would recommend a closing goal of 80%.

Other Enrollment Statistics
Other statistics that are related to enrollment are the number of student/parent conferences. In order to upgrade your students you need to have conferences. After you have the conferences, how many of these students are you upgrading? If you have 20-student conferences in a month and you upgrade 16, your upgrade percentage for the month is 80%, exactly where you need to be.

Opening Up Procedures

After you turn off the alarm system, make the school look open. Unlock the doors. Make sure that the open sign and the look of the school says open. Turn on the lights. Open the window blinds. Make sure people know that you’re open for business.

Check cleanliness of office. When you open, make sure the office looks like it’s ready for business. Anything left out from the night before, attendance cards, enrollment applications, pieces of information or mail, should all be properly stored so the office presents a clean, business like atmosphere.

Make sure that the floor, especially in front of the main door and office, is clean of everything. If necessary, sweep the main entrance. We have one chance to make a good first impression, so make a good first impression. Cleanliness counts!

Turn on computer and fax machine. The computer is central for gathering information and sending out information to the students. It is our great communication device. In order for it to work, it must be on. Open the computer to the Martial Arts America Program ‑ See administration

Check voice mail messages. ‑ While the computer is warming up, check the voice mail messages. Is anyone sick? We need to send them a get well card. Does someone need information? We need to call them with that information. When listening to the voice mail messages use the message information gathering form to:

1. Note caller

2. Note return phone number (if applicable)

3. Note message (see administration, messages forms and log)

4. Return all phone inquires (see returning phone inquiries, sales)

Weekly Goal Commitment

This sheet is to be completed each week by every staff member. Yes, that includes you.

Weekly Goal Commitment

 

Name­­­­__________________________ Week ending­­­­__________________________

 

My goals this week are:

__________________________­­­­________________________________________­­­­__________________________

The students I’ll chat with this week are:

__________________________­­­­________________________________________­­­­__________________________

My goals last week were:

__________________________­­­­__________________________­­­­________________________________________

My level of accomplishment was/why?

__________________________­­­­__________________________­­­­________________________________________

This week my continuing education commitiment will be spent on:

__________________________­­­­__________________________­­­­________________________________________

Contact Diary/Meetings Record

Name or Project                  Detail – Progress – Decisions

_________________________________

_________________________________

 

Accident/Incident Report Form

 

 

Accident Report Form

If in doubt, call 911 immediately!

Always advise the injured person to seek qualified medical advice!

Name of injured person: ______________________________________

Date of Injury: _____/_____/_____ Time of injury: ___________ AM/PM

Brief description of Injury: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Details of how injury happened: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(for additional space use the back of this page or attach additional pages)

__________________ __________________ ________________

Staff member                        Staff member                        Staff member

List all students in the class or witnesses: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

How was injury treated by reporting staff member? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

If injured person was less than 18 years of age, was the guardian notified? ______________

To whom was the injured person released? _______________________________________

Did you recommend medical treatment? _________________________________________

How did the injured person get medical treatment? _________________________________

On a separate piece of paper have all the witnesses describe what they saw and attach those papers to this form.

Notify the manager of the school of the accident.  After completing this form, keep a copy for the school’s records and forward the original to the manager at the corporate office.

Signature of employee completing this form

 

Time Management for Martial Arts School Owners

Martial Arts Management Starts With Prioritizing Your Day

No doubt you ended last year with high hopes for for the new year. How is that going? Congratulations to those of you who are on target to hit, or exceed your goals. For the rest of you, here is a martial arts management suggestion to help you gain more control of your day.

Start each week by determining the five most important, high return tasks that must be completed or moved forward that week. 

List them in columns, then list, in order of importance, the steps you must take to accomplish the task.

Some steps will require you while others can be delegated.

Task 1 Task 2 Task 3 Task 4 Task 5

step 1 step 1 step 1 step 1 step 1

step 2 step 2 step 2 step 2 step 2

step 3 step 3 step 13 step 3 step 3

Here is the powerful part. Each day, block out time to ONLY attack whatever steps are next for your most important tasks on the list. Turn off email, tell your team you are not available, close all browser windows and make whatever you are working on full screen. 

Stay with that task ONLY for the allotted time. You may only have time to attack one or two tasks each with this method, but you will move closer to your goals much faster.

The Martial Arts Gap

The GAP is the divide between your martial arts experience and the market’s expectations

It’s safe to say:

1. You love the martial arts.

2. The martial arts improved your life.

3. You want to share that experience with others and make a good living doing it.

It’s also safe to say:

1. The only reason you were raised in your style is that it was taught in the school you joined. 

2. You did not join the school seeking a style, forms, or any specific techniques.

3. You joined because it was geographically convenient and / or the cheapest option.

The love you have for your style, its techniques, and traditions is the result of indoctrination, not informed decision making. Simply put, you didn’t know what you didn’t know.

The GAP is the divide between your indoctrinated bias and the benefits that your prospects are seeking.

Empower Kickboxing™ strips away all of the complexity of style based martial arts and presents just the easiest to learn, most effective skills. The class focus is on different applications of these skills with an emphasis on conditioning.

The Result: The Gap is eliminated. The students learn skills and get fit much faster.

The Student Sales Funnel

by John Graden | Black Belt Management

Lesson 1: Branding and Image Control

Branding and Image Control

by John Graden | 8:49

Branding and Image Control

  • How to Take Control of Your School’s Image Online and Off-line
  • How to Build Your School’s Reputation
  • Word of Mouth Marketing is More Powerful Than Ever Now with Social Media

Lesson 2: Attracting and Keeping Students

Setting the Stage for Success

by John Graden | 4:20

What Does a New Student Cost?

by John Graden | 8:49

Attracting and Keeping Students

  • Creating the right school atmosphere.
  • Modern online and offline marketing to attract students.
  • How to measure the cost of getting a new student.

Lesson Three: Trial Lesson Strategies

How to Teach a Trial Lesson

by John Graden | 20:57

What Does a New Student Cost?

by John Graden | 8:49

Trial Lesson Strategies

  • How to focus a trial lesson on life skills.
  • How to create an emotional bond with parents and students in one class.
  • How to smoothly transition from the trial class into the enrollment conference.

Lesson Four: Student Retention

The Importance of Curriculum Design

by John Graden | 25:34

Black Belt Club

by John Graden | 8:44

Free Private Lessons

by John Graden | `1:38

Keeping Your Students Coming Back

  • Why retention is more important than enrollments.
  • How to quickly improve retention.
  • How to create a more effective curriculum for your students.

Lesson Five: Renewals

Keep the Focus on Renewals

by John Graden | 4:07

What is the Black Belt Club?

by John Graden | 4:55

Make Renewals a Privilege

by John Graden | 7:54

How to Pre-Qualify

by John Graden | 2:55

BBC Sales Presentation Role Play

by John Graden | 7:21

How to Present the Pricing

by John Graden | 2:52

Renewal Strategies

  • From first attraction until enrollment in the school is complete!

How to Set Tuition

How to Set Tuition

 

That’s Too Much For This Area

Few areas of running a school are as confusing and daunting as deciding how much to charge for lessons and then how to collect that tuition. This series of articles will help you get answers to the questions of how much to charge; what your tuition really means to your school; strategies for balancing paid in fulls with monthly; whether or not to use contracts; and other critical topics related to tuition pricing.

That’s Too Much For This Area

At the start of many of my seminars, I ask the audience of owners if they would be willing to sell me their black belt for $50,000. For $50,000 they erase martial arts from their life.

It would be as though never joined a school. Of course, this is an imaginary bet, but no one has ever said, “I would if I could.” Most people laugh and say they would not do it for a million dollars!

These are often the same owners who claim their area can’t support higher tuition. They’ll say the martial arts is worth more than $50,000 to them, but they are afraid to charge $100 per month for the same experience.

The common excuse is that “That’s too much for this area.” The real message is the owner doesn’t have the confidence to ask for fair tuition. There are a lot of excuses owners will give for why they charge so little, but there is not one good reason.

Most of us are brought up poor or middle class and then left to live the rest of our lives with the belief systems of the poor or the middle class. We’re taught that rich people are bad and that money is the root of all evil.

The truth is that “the love of money” is the root of all evil. To be sure,  there are always evil people, just like there are good people. Money is just a tool. You can build with it or use it to destroy.  

We’re also taught never to ask for money or we’ll appear greedy. This is the first reprogramming you’ll need in order to set fair tuition prices. You have to learn “to ask for the check.” Literally. Practice how to ask for a payment.

Typically, that is something like, “Would you like to use cash or a card?” or, “The total is $149. How would you like to handle that?” Say it over and over in your car as you’re driving around. The first few times, you may be nervous, but it won’t be long before it’s natural to you.

Rule One: If you do not value your martial arts school and its benefits for students, then no else will either.

How Much Should You Charge for Martial Arts Tuition?

by Joe Galea, Member Solutions, The Official Tuition Billing Company of MATA

It’s generally a good sign that you can increase your membership price if more than 15% of your memberships are paid in full.

Another time to comfortably raise prices with members: when you can justify the increase. Have you purchased new equipment recently? Invested in new instructors and staff? Added new services or Fitness programs? These improvements can be highlighted in the member price increase letter and serve as tangible enhancements that validate a price increase.

How Much Should You Charge?

When you raise your prices, you have to be extremely careful not to raise your prices by too much, otherwise you could lose members and be worse off than you were beforehand.

Here’s an example to illustrate my point:

Let’s say you have 100 members paying $100 per month. That’s $10,000 in monthly dues. You decide to increase your membership fee to $150 per month. If everyone accepts, your gross jumps to $15,000 and you have a positive cash flow gain of $5,000.

But what if half of your members feel that’s too much and drop out? Then you have 50 members paying $150 for a total of $7,500 or a net cash flow loss of $2,500.

Here’s an interesting fact to keep in mind: if you lost 30 members due to the $50 membership price increase, you would be left with 70 members at $150 … in other words, $10,500 in monthly dues. That’s a $500 monthly cash flow gain. You may be thinking … “that’s great!” But wait. Yes, you’ve gained some money but you’ve lost 30 members. That’s 30 fewer members that can refer new business, buy retail, attend events and purchase additional services.

Here are two steps to take to help determine your price increase:

Know what your competitors are charging. Search the web. Most Fitness businesses post their rates and specials on their websites. If they don’t, give them a call or have a friend of yours reach out. You could also send a “silent shopper” to the competitors in your area. Not only will you find out what they charge, you’ll also get a sense for the quality of service they provide.

Know what your members pay currently. It’s easiest to track the current rate your members are paying by using a software product like our member management software or the member reports in theMember Solutions billing portal. If you have a price difference of $10 from your highest to lowest rates, then you have less room to move. If your members are paying somewhere in the middle, you have a lot more room to move your membership rates.

How Do You Let Members Know About the Change?

Give as much notice as possible. I recommend notifying your members at least three months in advance to the increase if you can. This gives time for members to accept the change. Keep in mind that many members will forget about the change when it comes into effect. You should immediately update your marketing materials to reflect the new prices so new members have the new rates.

Write a letter
. You’re in a relationship business and have developed close relationships with your members. That said, you shouldn’t just send an email out. It lacks that personal touch. A personalized letter is a key part of delivering the news. A letter is more professional than an email or poster.

Be sure to explain the increase and address when the rates were last changed. Let your members know that they are important and that they can speak with you if they have any questions or concerns. Doing so opens up the lines of communication where you can address concerns individually and perhaps offer exemptions to those that cannot financially make the change.

Also make sure you justify the change in your letter. If you have invested in new equipment, added new services, or launched new classes, point that out.

If you cannot highlight the pros and differences that your services and facility offers over your competitors, then a rate increase may not be the best thing to do. This leads back to being better than your competitors, knowing their rates and why you’re better.

Tuition Pricing Strategies

Tuition Pricing Strategies

Few areas of running a school are as confusing and daunting as deciding how much to charge for lessons and then how to collect that tuition. This section will help you get answers to the questions of how much to charge; what your tuition really means to your school; strategies for balancing paid in fulls with monthly; whether or not to use contracts; and other critical topics related to tuition pricing.

That’s Too Much For This Area

At the start of many of my seminars, I ask the audience of owners if they would be willing to sell me their black belt for $10,000. For $10,000 they erase martial arts from their life. It would be as though never joined a school. Of course, this is an imaginary bet, but no one has ever said, “I would if I could.”

This is often the same owner who claims his area can’t support a higher tuition. He says his martial arts is worth more than $10,000 to him, but he is afraid to charge $100 per month for the same experience in his town. The common response is, “That’s too much for this area.” What he is really saying higher tuition might rub the poor people the wrong way in his community. He is also saying I don’t have the confidence yet in the value of what I’m doing to ask for that much money.

There are a lot of excuses owners will give for why they charge so little, but there is not one good reason.

Don’t Let Competition Set Your Prices

Most owners set their tuition by finding out what everyone else in town is charging and then under-cutting them by $10 or so in hopes students will stampede to them. However, our observation through the years is that the largest school in town usually has the highest tuition, so the evidence seems to be that undercutting with tuition can actually reduce your response.

Setting tuition based upon competitors is off target. We think it’s a mistake to base your tuition on the competition rather than how you want to position your school in the market. It’s important to know who your customer is and/or who you want it to be. It’s natural to want to have a price that everyone feels is fair and will enroll. That price doesn’t exist.

Certainly, there are situations where the instructor simply is not that good yet or you are teaching out of a community center where pricing is set by others. However, for commercial storefront schools setting tuition is a critically process that has to be driven from an understanding of:

  1. How you want to position your school
  2. The demographics you want to reach
  3. Your expenses on a month-to-month basis
  4. How much you want to make as a school owner

Nowhere in that list is, “What your competitor is charging.”

Choosing Your Market

Step one in the Black Belt Management System is Image Control. Setting your tuition is a factor of your image control. Set it too low and your school will attract lower income students who may make the school less attractive for the more affluent markets.

Next time you are driving, take a look at the cars on the road. Are they all cheap older models or are there some mid-priced and some luxury cars, mini-vans and SUVs too. The Mercedes Benz dealer doesn’t look at the Ford dealer to determine his pricing. He is not selling to the Ford customer. He is selling to a demographic that can and will spend the money required for a Mercedes.

A key point here is that he knows who he is selling to. For the martial artist, this is not, on the surface, as easy to determine your market. Many of us are stuck in that altruistic implied wisdom myth that their mission is to save the community from the dangers of a world without self-confidence, respect and self-defense. This is the owner who doesn’t want to turn anyone away because he wants to help, “everyone.” The truth, “everyone” doesn’t want help and “everyone” will not use the help if it’s offered for free.

If you are basing your success on how well you help your students improve their lives then you are choosing to live a life of tremendous frustration and long-term stress.

“We can’t help the poor by becoming one of them.” Abraham Lincoln

In order for you to be able to help “anyone” your doors have to be open. If you are at another job because your school can’t support your family then your doors are not open. It takes money to keep the doors open. The vast majority of the money will be in tuition.

It makes sense then that if we need money from our students then let’s look at our student market using money as a guide.

If we were to take 100% of the potential market for your school and divide them by income into five categories:

The Top Third – High Income Earners

The Middle Third – Average Income Earners

The Lower Third – Low Income Earners

Our market is in the top two thirds, not the bottom one third. Once our school is stable and we have a strong cash flow, we may be able to extend scholarships and outreach programs to include the lower third, but if we let the lower third drive our tuition pricing, we will always struggle.

Lets’ compare two schools in the same town, each with 100 students. One school charges $50 per month and the other charges $150 per month. They are in the same town. Why is the 2 nd school earning three times the tuition as the first school? Is it three times better? Is it three times bigger? The difference is the 2 nd school determined that it was going to market to the upper two thirds of the market and then built a program to support that goal. While this school may not be three times bigger or better, it is probably three times cleaner. It’s probably three times easier to work with and three times more professional and safe in its presentation. I can assure you owner spends far more than three times on his own professional education and at least two hours a week on his staff’s. If this school created an outreach program for the lower third market, I bet they could help more than three times the number of people than the school charging $50 per month.

Just using rough figures, lets say each school collects 80% of the tuition it is owed each month. Rarely do 100% of our students pay each month.

School A @ 100 students x $50 per month x .75 = $4,000 per month in tuition.

School B @ 100 students x $150 per month x .75 = $12,000 per month in tuition.

That is an $8,000 per month difference in gross tuition, which equals $96,000 per year!

How to Set Your Tuition

In 1974, the tuition at the Florida Karate Academy in Largo, Florida, was a 12-month contract at $25 per month. If you just raised tuition three percent per year from that point, you would have tuition of about $60 per month in 2004. When I opened my school in 1986, my tuition averaged $75 per month. At three percent inflation, this would total $127 per month today. What other service has only increased three percent per year? Not many that I can think of.

While many schools are more in the $60 range, others are north of $200 per month. What is the difference? The most successful martial arts school owners highly value what they do. Tiger Shulmann said this in an interview in my Martial Arts Professional magazine in 2001: “I’ll give you an idea of what I think about the amount of money that we charge for our classes. $1,500 doesn’t scare me at all to charge for martial arts training. I think it’s too little, actually. But we have to stay somewhat within the industry’s standard.”

His implication is that he would charge more, but the industry is holding him back. Tiger clearly values what he does. All the top school owners do. Notice that the first thing he said was he was not scared at all to charge $1,500 for training. Was he also saying other people might be scared to charge that amount? Would you be scared? This is a guy who told me he had more than 20,000 students in over 35 schools at the time. I visited his headquarters and saw the August revenue gross numbers from all the schools on the computer. It was only the third week of what is typically the slowest month of the year, but the lowest gross was in the mid-$30,000s, and the highest was the mid-$90,000s.

Not only was Tiger not scared to charge higher than the competition, the market was not afraid to pay for it either.

Your tuition rate and how it is presented will play a fundamental part in your school’s image. Price is the main factor in a prospect’s decision to join if you make it the main factor. If the most compelling reason for someone to join your school is that you are cheaper than the next guy, you are putting all of your eggs in the wrong basket.

Price is a factor, but not the factor in whether the prospect moves forward to join your school. If a prospect has shopped other schools, then your tuition will naturally be compared to the other schools. That doesn’t mean the lower price wins. It’s just another point of comparison. If the prospect has not shopped other schools, and most do not, your tuition indicates the value you and your current student body place on the training. It also begins to establish in the prospect’s mind what to expect in the school.

How To Raise Tuition

You must charge what you feel the benefits of what you teach is worth. If you feel your benefits are not worth that much, then charge low prices. If however, you feel that you offer a valuable service to your students, then reflect the value of your service in setting the price of your lessons.

Don’t raise the price of lessons on existing students if you can help it. When raising prices, try to avoid the temptation to raise prices on your existing students.
The natural attrition rates of most schools will soon have the balance of the new students at your higher price. Raising the price of lessons on existing students can provide them with the reason they need to drop out.

Communication is the key to price increases. 
If you do need to raise prices on existing students, always explain the reason for your increase. Explain to them that the increase is due to an increase in rent or insurance. Send them a letter and it will fly with ninety five percent of your students.

Simply raise your rates with no explanation and expect to lose scores of students. They will think you just got greedy. Remember, it’s much less expensive to keep an existing student rather than to go and find a new one.

One time you can usually getaway with a price increase across the board is at the beginning of a new year. People almost expect prices to go up in January. Still, handle all price increases with care. You can also give students a chance to renew or cash-out in advance before the new price increase.

Each year, we suggest you have a tuition increase. Here is how you do it.

As with most changes, the best strategy is to make the changes with new students first. So as of January 1st , your tuition raises for all new students. That way the higher paying students will begin to replace the lower paying students.

For your current student body, here is a strategy to raise their tuition. You can tell your students that due to an increase in expenses, tuition will be raised on January 1 st . At that point, just as an example, let’s say the new tuition will be $100 per month. But, since you guys have been loyal to the school your tuition will only increase to $90. This way, it’s almost a relief to them to have it raised only to $90 instead of $100. Again, tell them tuition for new students will go to this level and then find a level in between the current level and the new level to set for current students.

If the current students are at $79 and the new students will be at $99, split the difference with your current students to $89 as a sign of appreciation for their support.

How Much Is Your Tuition Really?

This is a little drill that can make grown black belts cry. Here is an audit you can do to help you understand how much tuition you are really collecting each month per student.

1. Total Tuition Collected: Take last year’s total tuition collections. This is the sum of paid-in-fulls (PIFs), registration fees (uniform or any other hard costs deducted), and monthly billing received (after deducting refunds and any billing and credit card charges).

2. Total Student Count: Add all the students you had last year on January 1st to the number of students you enrolled over the next 12 months. If you started the year with 100 students plus you enrolled 10 new students per month (10 x 12 months = 120), you have a grand total of 220 students. Of course, unless you have 100-percent retention, you don’t have 220 students in your school right now, but that’s a different chapter.

3. Divide last year’s total tuition collected (1) by the total student count (2). This is the annual tuition value of your students

4. Take that number and divide it by 12. This is the average monthly value of your students. To be more accurate, you would do a month-by-month analysis that removes the dropouts as they stop paying. That would make the average monthly value higher, but this example is designed to be easier to understand and follow.

Let’s use real numbers. I’ll keep the money high and the expenses low to soften the blow.

1. Last year you averaged 80 students paying $133 per month in your school. You also have 30 students who cashed out last year or “shorted out” their contract.

80 x $133 = $10,640 per month gross.

Billing fees, refunds, etc. = approximately 10% in expenses

Net monthly billing: $9,576

$9,576 x 12 = $114,912 total monthly billing

+ Total “shorts:” 30 @ average $600 each = $18,000

Registration fees: 105 x $199 = $22,885

Paid In Fulls for annual: 15 @ $999 each = $14,985

= Tuition total: $170,782

2. Students taking class last year

100 students to start with

Enrolled 10 per month = 120

100 + 120 = 220 students who took classes last year

3. Last year’s tuition per student per year

a. $170,782  220 = $776.28 per student per year

4. Last year’s tuition per student per month

a. $776.28  12 = $64.69 per student per month

It’s kind of scary when you realize how much of a hit your tuition takes. Keep in mind these are pretty simple numbers with a too simple formula. The real truth is that often the numbers are worse. Family discounts, cancellations, barters, and students who slipped through the cracks all bring the average tuition per student number down.

What can we do to pump these numbers up? You may have noticed that we didn’t include any renewals. The reason is simple. Most schools still don’t have a solid renewal plan. The best renewal plan I know of is also the most important to your school’s energy and atmosphere, and that is the Black Belt Club or the Black Sash Club or whatever you want to call a program where the students set black belt as their goal (and you don’t guarantee it).

1. Let’s take the same example as above, but add in the revenue from renewals.

Tuition total from above = $170,782

+ Renewal registrations: 24 x $299 = $7,176

+ Renewal PIF: 5 @ $2,999 = $14,995

= Tuition total: $192,953

2. Students taking class last year

100 students to start with

Enrolled 10 per month = 120

100 + 120 = 220 students who took classes last year

3. Last year’s tuition per student per year

a. $192,953  220 = $877.05 per student per year

4. Last year’s tuition per student per month

a. $73.08 per student per month

Total difference in net tuition collected = $22,171! Still, the number is far less than the average monthly tuition you are charging.

Still, if you have been procrastinating about launching a Black Belt Club, I have 22,171 good reasons for you to do it now. Many schools have gone from an agreement-based renewal program to offering the Black Belt Club membership for an annual one-time payment of $500. Regardless of how you charge for Black Belt Club, it will add a significant amount of revenue to your school.

Martial Arts School Insurance

Martial arts school
insurance Coverage

“Insurance is like self-defense.
When you need it, nothing else will do.”
–John Graden

Send a request to SFIC to set up a quick review of your insurance needs and current coverage. The call and consultation are free.

  • MATA Members get $25 credit.
  • MATA Certification Graduates get a $100 credit.

The Best Rates and Coverage

Any training accident or disgruntled student can turn into an expensive and highly stressful lawsuit. Get the liability coverage you need from a company that’s been protecting martial arts professionals like you for over 30 years.

 

MATA Discounts

You may be overpaying or under covered. Get a free quote today and thanks to your MATA membership – save $25.

SFIC will also extend a $100 Insurance Policy Credit for schools with MATA Certified Master Instructor

30+ Years of Martial Arts Insurance Experience

Sports Fitness Insurance Corporation (SFIC) has over 30 years of experience in the Martial Arts industry. SFIC knows the best coverage for schools like yours.  Pay only for what you really need.

Every martial arts school needs insurance.

Few things in life are as stressful and expensive as a liability lawsuit against you and your school.

Get the protection you need from experts who understand our world.

SFIC is one of the largest fitness underwriting companies in the nation serving clients throughout the US and is a preferred provider of many major fitness franchises including Curves for Women, Gold’s Gym, Brickhouse Cardio and others.

“Our SFIC representative always has our best interests at the top of her mind and is very patient and understanding that with all the day-to-day pressing responsibilities of running a martial arts business, insurance isn’t always at the top of mine.

Chris Rappold

Personal Best Karate-3 Locations

Insurance For Martial Arts Schools

For Martial Arts schools serving both youth and adults. Most martial arts styles are covered. This program offers both professional and general liability.

Martial Arts School Liability Coverage is Designed for:

  • Traditional Martial Arts Styles with Light Strikes and Holds
  • Non-contact Kickboxing or Cardio Kickboxing
  • Non-contact Boxing
  • Boxing & Kickboxing Aerobics
  • Weapons Training with Fake or Padded Weapons

Unacceptable Risks include:

  • Live Bladed Weapons
  • Firearms
  • Full Contact Boxing
  • Full Contact Kickboxing
  • Full Contact Mixed Martial Arts

Get Your Martial Arts Insurance review Today

Dealing with Difficult People

Dealing with Difficult People

Student Service

 

The 24-Hour Rule for Student Service

10 Steps to Resolving Student Complaints

No matter how good your school or staff is is, you’re going to experience complaints from time to time.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t lose students every time you make a mistake; you lose them when you don’t properly handle their complaints.

Think of complaints as an opportunity to impress your students.

1. Respond within four hours to the complaint via phone (not email).

2. Listen carefully to the complaint.

3. Apologize for any inconvenience caused (whether real or imagined).

4. Restate the complaint back to the student. “Let me make sure I understand your concern…”

5. Thank the student for bringing the issue to your attention.

6. Ask the student,“What would you like to do?”This is really important. Often, the answer is much less than you expect.

7. Describe exactly what you are willing and able to do to resolve the issue.

8. If you can’t do anything, avoid citing business policy. Instead, use the “feel, felt, found” pattern, for example. “I understand how you feel. A number of student through the years have felt the same way. In time, they found that…”

You can also use the “because” bridge: “I understand you want this, this and this. Because we have to be fair to ALL of our clients, we’re only able to do this in these types of situations. Again, thanks for bringing this to our attention.”

9. Write down what you promised in your log book and follow through.

10. Send a sendoutcards.com thank-you note (you may include a gift certificate for a local restaurant as a surprise gift).

The 24-Hour Rule

The 24-Hour Rule

 

10 Steps to Resolving Student Complaints

No matter how good your school or staff is is, you’re going to experience complaints from time to time. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t lose students every time you make a mistake; you lose them when you don’t properly handle their complaints. Think of complaints as an opportunity to impress your clients.

1. Respond within four hours to the complaint via phone (not email).

2. Listen carefully to the complaint.

3. Apologize for any inconvenience caused (whether real or imagined).

4. Restate the complaint back to the student. “Let me make sure I understand your concern…”

5. Thank the student for bringing the issue to your attention.

6. Ask the student,“What would you like to do?”This is really important. Often, the answer is much less than you expect.

7. Describe exactly what you are willing and able to do to resolve the issue.

8. If you can’t do anything, avoid citing business policy. Instead, use the “feel, felt, found” pattern, for example. “I understand how you feel. A number of student through the years have expressed the same feeling. In time, they found that…” You can also use the “because” bridge: “I understand you want this, this and this. Because we have to be fair to ALL of our clients, we’re only able to do this
in these types of situations. Again, thanks for bringing this to our attention.”

9. Write down what you promised in your log book and follow through.

10. Send a sendoutcards.com thank-you note (you may include a gift certificate for a local restaurant as a surprise gift).